Dalits Media Watch – English News Updates 01.05.16

 

Dalit boy beaten to death in Uttar Pradesh – newsx

http://www.newsx.com/national/26900-dalit-boy-beaten-to-death-in-uttar-pradesh

Dalit cop stopped from entering temple – nyoooz

http://www.nyoooz.com/dehradun/446847/dalit-cop-stopped-from-entering-temple

To cut caste, dalits try `The Middle Path’ – The times of india

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/To-cut-caste-dalits-try-The-Middle-Path/articleshow/52060028.cms

Thol Thirumavalavan braves heat, connects with people – Deccan chronicle

http://www.deccanchronicle.com/nation/politics/010516/thol-thirumavalavan-braves-heat-connects-with-people.html

Paromita Vohra: The Rules – Mid day

http://www.mid-day.com/articles/paromita-vohra-the-rules/17185197

Dalits protest – The hindu

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-karnataka/dalits-protest/article8543499.ece

To cut caste, dalits try `The Middle Path’ – Times of india

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/To-cut-caste-dalits-try-The-Middle-Path/articleshow/52060028.cms

Saharanpur tense after caste clash – The hindu

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/other-states/saharanpur-tense-after-caste-clash/article8542450.ece

 

Newsx

Dalit boy beaten to death in Uttar Pradesh

http://www.newsx.com/national/26900-dalit-boy-beaten-to-death-in-uttar-pradesh

The mob taking justice its own hand by brutally thrashed the boy until deathGonda: A Dalit teenager was tied to the pegs and lynched to death by an angry mob over a petty thievery in Gonda district of Uttar Pradesh under Khargupur police station.The mob taking justice its own hand, brutally thrashed him until death.Jurisdictional Municipal Rajesh Tripathi, Inspector in Charge of Diwakar Singh and dog squad team of forensic department rushed to the spot.  Police have filed an FIR against three persons on a complaint made by the victim’s father. All the three persons are absconding and their whereabouts is still unknownThe dead body had been sent for autopsy.

Nyoooz

Dalit cop stopped from entering temple

http://www.nyoooz.com/dehradun/446847/dalit-cop-stopped-from-entering-temple

Summary: Geetaram told TOI.Agitated by such discriminatory incidents in Garhwal’sJaunsarBawar region, Dalit activist SaraswatiKunwar has decided to start a movement on the issue. The management of the temple decided to discontinue the centuries-old “tradition” by announcing that “everyone will in future be welcome”. It will begin from the JaunsarBawar region,” Kuamrsaid.InJanuray this year, Dalits and women were allowed in the famous Parsuram temple in the region after 400 years. “In other states, women are struggling to enter temples, but in Uttarakhand, even men struggle to enter temples. DEHRADUN: In Chakrata, a Dalit constable had the gates of the local Mahasu, Vikar and Silgur temples shut on his face when he went there with his newly wedded wife to seek blessings.DEHRADUN: In Chakrata, a Dalit constable had the gates of the local Mahasu, Vikar and Silgur temples shut on his face when he went there with his newly wedded wife to seek blessings. The local Dalits have complained about a ban on their entry into these temples to the governor who has assured them of a fair inquiry into the matter.On April 27, constable Geetaram, 25, and his family members started the weddingrituals with a visit to the local temple in Bisoi whose gates were allegedly shut upon him. “Since it was an auspicious moment, we preferred to remain quiet, rather than picking up a fight with the upper caste men, on this subject, but we got really devastated when the gates of even Mahasu, Vikar and Silgur temples in Rangoi village were also locked for us. We were very disheartened,” said Jagdishram, Geetaram’selder brother and a schoolteacher.”In other states, women are struggling to enter temples, but in Uttarakhand, even men struggle to enter temples. Such incidents lower people’s self-esteem. I am a cop who fights for the people.

The times of india

To cut caste, dalits try `The Middle Path’

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/To-cut-caste-dalits-try-The-Middle-Path/articleshow/52060028.cms

Following in the footsteps of B R Ambedkar, the mother and brother of scholar Rohith Vemula – whose suicide over alleged caste discrimination triggered an outrage – embraced Buddhism on the dalit icon’s 125th birth anniversary on April 14. Their `change of faith’ may have got the nation’s attention, but similar conversions are taking place in Tamil Nadu albeit silently, with a section of educated dalits converting to Buddhism.

While census data reveals that the population of Buddhists in Tamil Nadu doubled between 2001 and 2011, religious leaders claim that the trend has continued in the last five years as well. Embracing Buddhism gives freedom from caste-based dis crimination and ensures right to equality at the same time retaining benefits of reservation, converted Buddhists observed. “When I say that I am a Buddhist, people do not ask any more questions about caste.Before I changed faiths, I found that I was often subjected to caste discrimination when people learned about my background,” says Jai Samyak, who was known as Jai Ganesh till he embraced Buddhism in 2010.

The 35-year-old assistant professor of Tamil says he embraced Buddhism as a mark of protest against social discrimination institutionalised in the name of caste, taking a cue from Ambedkar. He adds that his Buddhist name Jai Samyak means `Hail Rationalism’.

As per the census, nearly 5,400 people were Buddhists in Tamil Nadu in 2001, with the number crossing 11,100 a decade later in 2011. According to Ven. Bhikku V M Mouriya Methapal, a senior Buddhist Monk based in Chennai, at least 2000 more in the State would have turned Buddhists in the last five years. “To my knowledge anywhere between 2,000 and 3,000 people would have officially converted to Buddhism, of which a major ity are Hindu Scheduled Castes (SC) and dalit Christians. Some are from backward classes too though they are minuscule in number,” he says.

Adopting Buddhist names before conversion is essential. “But, when people with names like Sujatha and Ashok come, we accept their names as they are associated with Buddhism,” the Monk adds.

Methapal is one of five monks in the state authorised to issue certificates to people embracing Buddhism. The certificate is important for obtaining a gazette notification for conversion and community certificate. Hindu adi dravidars who convert to Buddhism can retain their SC status with reservation benefits. People also have the option of getting a community certificate with Buddhism, wherein they fall under the category of religious minorities.

“The conversions are mostly reported in urban areas and we have observed that educated dalits are embracing Buddhism. Some people are yet to apply for gazette notification in the state. The numbers are growing,” says K Kalamani, a Buddhist member in the TN Minorities Commission.

Editor of Dalit Murasu, Punitha Pandiyan, says the absence of a mass dalit leader in Tamil Nadu to propagate Buddhism like Ambedkar -the architect of the Indian Constitution who embraced Buddhism in 1956 -was a major factor for fewer people converting to the religion. “In fact, apolitical Ambedkar movements are taking Buddhism to dalit masses here,” he says.

“The need for equality drives dalits to Buddhism,” says Priyadarshana Jain, former director of the Centre for Buddha Studies and HOD of the Jainology, University of Madras, noting that dalits in the state are taking to `Neo Buddhism’ propagated by Ambedkar,.

TN has a historical association with Buddhism and discovery of ancient Buddha idols at Irandam Kattalai village and Arakkonam near Chennai are examples of the influence of the religion, say scholars. The state has also been a torch bearer in dalits embracing Buddhism that dates back to the 19th century when Pandithar Iyothee Thass, a renowned Siddha practitioner from the depressed classes, converted.

Deccan chronicle

Thol Thirumavalavan braves heat, connects with people

http://www.deccanchronicle.com/nation/politics/010516/thol-thirumavalavan-braves-heat-connects-with-people.html

KATTUMANNARKOIL: Bursting of crackers signal the arrival of VCK leader Thol Thirumavalavan’s cavalcade into the village as young and the old gather on either side of the narrow road to welcome their leader in the backdrop of slogans hailing him and Dalit movement.

Thirumavalavan gets the same kind of ‘hero’s welcome’ in every village in this constituency with youth in large numbers rallying round the most prominent Dalit face in Tamil Nadu politics.

VCK leader Thol Thirumavalavan meets the villagers on Saturday. (Photo: DC)

Braving the hot sun, the former Chidambaram MP walks round every village and opens his heart and mind to the people, especially youth. He does not attend any public meetings, but does door-to-door campaigning.

On Friday, Thirumavalavan’s day began in near-by Chidambaram, with a meeting with party cadres. A quick breakfast and the VCK leader comes out of his modest room and waves at his supporters and cadre of alliance parties. Then his modest convoy reaches Poorthangudi village.

“Please vote for ‘ring’ symbol. And also ensure people in your village vote for me. No vote should be wasted,” he tells villagers, as he gets out of his car to meet them with folded hands.

Clad in a formal brown shirt and black trouser, his campaign is quite simple. There are no posters, flags and festoons in the areas he visits, except for the flags carried by cadres.

Even as enthusiastic youth took Thirumavalavan all round the village, one can hear the whisper of women and elderly scolding youngsters for blocking a glimpse of the leader.

Knowing them well, he shakes hand with everyone, connecting with them with ease and enquiring their well being. His love for kids is very apparent as he stops seeing a child and starts interacting with it. This personal touch, his supporters say, is what differentiates him from other leaders.

When asked why they are so fond of Thirumavalavan, V. Rajavalli, (55) of Kaliayamalai, near Veeranam tank, said only after his arrival in politics, they (Dalits) were able to walk in the streets without fear of being beaten up by Caste Hindus.

“We used to face physical violence and all forms of discrimination. We will not be allowed to have tea in the cup meant for Caste Hindus and our men should not wear dhoti. Now everything has changed. This is all because of Thirumavalavan who gave us the courage to fight against injustice,” she explained.

After touring the dalit villages, he arrived at Lalpettai to campaign in the predominantly Muslim locality. He sought support of Muslims who came out of the mosque after  offering Friday  prayers. He was surrounded by his cadres even when he takes a break from campaign in the afternoon.

As he moved to a cadre’s house for lunch and took rest for a couple of hours, his cadres followed him. “They are very fond of me. They want to discuss some issue with me, so there is no time to take rest. I am used to it,” he said.

The VCK leader never hesitates to explain if somebody raises a question. A. Balamurguan of Periya Theru in Kattumannarkudi Town Panchayat complained that nobody is bothered about them.  “There is a limit on what an MLA can do. If you vote our alliance to power, we will be able to implement schemes to uplift
poor”, Thirumavalavan explains.

Mid day

Paromita Vohra: The Rules

http://www.mid-day.com/articles/paromita-vohra-the-rules/17185197

Recently, the highly ranked Hindu College, in Delhi University, started a women’s hostel. Everyone cheered and few asked why it took the 117-year-old college so long. After all, why single it out? This is the story in so many colleges even in the big cities of India. Anyway, as we know, all proclamations of gender equality are a gift horse that must be looked in the mouth. And here’s what a look at this particular gift reveals. First, the fees: R82,000 annually for the women’s hostel in comparison to Rs 47,000 for men. Residents cannot enroll in coaching classes or part/full-time employment without prior permission from the warden. Thoda gender, thoda class. Equal treatment of another kind.

There was of course a dress code-why control by halves? “Residents are expected to dress in a manner which is the normal norm in society” while in common areas. That’s the kind of vagueness that leaves everything to the discretion of “authorities” clearing the path for, well, authoritarianism. This rule has been withdrawn now after protests.

Most importantly, girls cannot have visitors in their rooms and must meet only in the visitors room. And then, only those whom their parents have submitted in an approved list at the time of admission.

No other rule belies the true approach to women than the last one. Girls’ education is our favourite ploy to prove we care about women’s freedom and progress, when this is the very thing we grudge women. How are students supposed to make new friends and support structures in a new place then?

Not so long ago, girls at Aligarh University had to fight against discrimination in library access. The movement Pinjra Tod/Break the Hostel Locks, organising for fair, freer women’s hostels, has hundreds of women from around the country responding, often anonymously because they feared retribution from authorities if they speak up openly.

Of course “authorities”, those authors of rules, will have many “good” reasons to justify prejudicial rules. It’s all for the safety and izzat of girls. Their parents want us to do this.

And it’s true. Parents collude with authorities on this front. They heap all responsibility and rules on young women so no one can ask them, bhai, what rules and responsibilities apply to you? These kinds of rules are in fact the refusal to take responsibility for a nurturing, enabling environment for young people to transition to adulthood.With all these rules, the young Dalit woman, Delta Meghwal murdered and possibly raped in a college in Bihar was not protected even in her own hostel.

Such rules show that we want to give women an education, but throw it in their faces, saying, don’t ask for anything else. Don’t expect to be free, make friends and strengthen networks, learn new things, explore new cities,

learn how to be a person in the world. Your job is just to be an achieving mark-sheet, which is society’s forged certificate of progressiveness. Last week, a young woman in Kota killed herself because she thought her JEE marks weren’t good enough, though they were far more than that.

But, how to have any sense of proportion, when that’s all you are expected to have – marks? Parents, wardens and colleges need to think about the meaning of education: how it can strengthen spirits and make resilient adults who can cope with life. The fantasy of submissive automata might seem to indicate order and control. But it is violence whose costs are the deep loss of spirit and soul of our own children. Grow up and face this so it can change.

The hindu

Dalits protest

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-karnataka/dalits-protest/article8543499.ece

The Dalit SangharshaSamiti of Sugur protested against the administration’s failure to provide them with a cremation ground. On Friday, Gutyamma (68), a resident had passed away. The lack of land has forced residents to cremate the deceased on the banks of the Tunga. They said that they would cremate the deceased on the Gram Panchayat premises in protest.

Times of india

To cut caste, dalits try `The Middle Path’

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/To-cut-caste-dalits-try-The-Middle-Path/articleshow/52060028.cms

YogeshKabirdoss | TNN | May 1, 2016, 05.45 AM IST

Following in the footsteps of B R Ambedkar, the mother and brother of scholar RohithVemula – whose suicide over alleged caste discrimination triggered an outrage – embraced Buddhism on the dalit icon’s 125th birth anniversary on April 14.Their `change of faith’ may have got the nation’s attention, but similar conversions are taking place in Tamil Nadu albeit silently, with a section of educated dalits converting to Buddhism.
While census data reveals that the population of Buddhists in Tamil Nadu doubled between 2001 and 2011, religious leaders claim that the trend has continued in the last five years as well. Embracing Buddhism gives freedom from caste-based dis crimination and ensures right to equality at the same time retaining benefits of reservation, converted Buddhists observed. “When I say that I am a Buddhist, people do not ask any more questions about caste.Before I changed faiths, I found that I was often subjected to caste discrimination when people learned about my background,” says Jai Samyak, who was known as Jai Ganesh till he embraced Buddhism in 2010.The 35-year-old assistant professor of Tamil says he embraced Buddhism as a mark of protest against social discrimination institutionalised in the name of caste, taking a cue from Ambedkar. He adds that his Buddhist name Jai Samyak means `Hail Rationalism’.As per the census, nearly 5,400 people were Buddhists in Tamil Nadu in 2001, with the number crossing 11,100 a decade later in 2011. According to Ven. Bhikku V M MouriyaMethapal, a senior Buddhist Monk based in Chennai, at least 2000 more in the State would have turned Buddhists in the last five years. “To my knowledge anywhere between 2,000 and 3,000 people would have officially converted to Buddhism, of which a major ity are Hindu Scheduled Castes (SC) and dalit Christians. Some are from backward classes too though they are minuscule in number,” he says.AdoptingBuddhist names before conversion is essential. “But, when people with names like Sujatha and Ashok come, we accept their names as they are associated with Buddhism,” the Monk adds.Methapal is one of five monks in the state authorised to issue certificates to people embracing Buddhism. The certificate is important for obtaining a gazette notification for conversion and community certificate. Hindu adidravidars who convert to Buddhism can retain their SC status with reservation benefits. People also have the option of getting a community certificate with Buddhism, wherein they fall under the category of religious minorities.”The conversions are mostly reported in urban areas and we have observed that educated dalits are embracing Buddhism. Some people are yet to apply for gazette notification in the state. The numbers are growing,” says K Kalamani, a Buddhist member in the TN Minorities Commission.Editor of Dalit Murasu, PunithaPandiyan, says the absence of a mass dalit leader in Tamil Nadu to propagate Buddhism like Ambedkar -the architect of the Indian Constitution who embraced Buddhism in 1956 -was a major factor for fewer people converting to the religion. “In fact, apolitical Ambedkar movements are taking Buddhism to dalit masses here,” he says.”The need for equality drives dalits to Buddhism,” says Priyadarshana Jain, former director of the Centre for Buddha Studies and HOD of the Jainology, University of Madras, noting that dalits in the state are taking to `Neo Buddhism’ propagated by Ambedkar,.TN has a historical association with Buddhism and discovery of ancient Buddha idols at IrandamKattalai village and Arakkonam near Chennai are examples of the influence of the religion, say scholars. The state has also been a torch bearer in dalits embracing Buddhism that dates back to the 19th century when PanditharIyotheeThass, a renowned Siddha practitioner from the depressed classes, converted.

The hindu

Saharanpur tense after caste clash

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/other-states/saharanpur-tense-after-caste-clash/article8542450.ece

Thirty people including several policemen were injured in a major clash between people belonging to Thakur and Dalit communities in Ghadkauli village in Saharanpur on Saturday, the police officials said. The situation in the Saharanpur village and its vicinity remains tense and Provincial Arms Constabulary personnel have been deployed to prevent further violence, after a clash over the defacement of a signboard at a Dalit majority area, as well as subsequent reports that ink was thrown at a statue of Dr. Ambedkarnearby.According to the Senior Superintendent of Police Saharanpur, R.P. Singh, the situation spun out of control after the reports of the alleged insult spread in the area.

Sound of gunshots“In no time the two communities indulged in stone-throwing. We also heard several rounds of firing. When the police tried to stop them, they attacked us. Several policemen got injured in the cross-fight,” BrijeshKushwaha, the Circle Officer of Fatehpur police station who was also injured told The Hindu.The police officials said that clashes between the two communities had increased in last few months, including an incident over a wedding party from one community being denied access through an area populated by the other community. Last week, a Dalit was allegedly shot dead by Thakur community members in the adjacent Nanauta village when they found him urinating on a plot of land belonging to them. Three men were arrested in the case, but tensions continue to simmer.

News monitored by AMRESH & AJEET

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